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Illustration Essay On Gun Control

Gun Control


Gun control has been a contentious issue in the past, including in the recent U.S. presidential elections. A section of the citizenry is concerned that banning gun ownership or severely limiting the citizens’ right to use guns will be an infringement on their rights. However, the recent increase in mass shootings and assault against police officers provides a leeway for the placement of limits on gun ownership and use. This paper argues that gun control is necessary both in the short run and in future.

Controlling handguns, for instance, limits the number of new gun owners thus limiting the likelihood of more crime being committed. Gun control will to a great extent save lives. First, the largest number of homicides is usually linked to the law sector, where homicides by gun account for the greatest number of casualties. One of the key reasons why gun control is necessary is the increase in shooting cases, particularly in schools. Several innocent school children have previously died due to the prevalence of a high number of guns in the hands of civilians. This has encouraged gunmen to use the arms inappropriately.

In addition, some of the opponents of gun control state that hunting is a key activity in their life and that they require guns to hunt. Still, some of the weapons used for hunting are assault and semi-automatic. In fact, assault weapons, which account for a significant number of weapons held by private citizens, is not meant to be used for sport hunting purposes. However, when someone insists that he is using an AR-15 for use in sports, it barely makes sense. Using semi-automatic weapons for hunting purposes amount to misuse. Automatic and semi-automatic weapons are the best choice for mass shooters hence such weapons in wrong hands is extremely risky. Such weapons need to be in the hands of law enforcers only. Handguns can do just fine for hunting purposes.

Individuals and groups that oppose gun control further point to the Second Amendment which allows civilians to own firearms for the purpose of individual and societal protection. However, such rights made sense during moments when private citizens did not trust the national government. The American civil war of the mid 19th century gave civilians such a chance. Yet in modern days where private citizens have turned to amassing several firearms with no clear threat to their lives, it is necessary to pursue the Second Amendment with caution. Cases of armed civilians shooting police officers dead have been on the rise in the past five years. In this regard, the pursuit of the Second Amendment must be cautious, and gun control needs to be enforced.

One of the aspects that make gun control relatively difficult is the ability of armed civilians to intervene and stop criminals at scenes of crime. In reality, however, very few cases of intervention by armed civilians have been recorded in the past at scenes of crime. Mass killings continue in schools, and no one intervenes in such cases because a gunman comes with the sole intention of murder. Expecting armed civilians to respond is harder than simply placing checks that prevent the gunman from owning the gun in the first place.

In conclusion gun ownership and use needs to be controlled. It is a contentious but necessary decision. Such a move would not only limit access to firearms hence save lives, but it will also reduce the rampant cases of mass shootings and high rates of homicides that define the current society. Law enforcement agencies need to be empowered to protect civilians and civilians need to trust law enforcers to do their work. Application of the Second Amendment should be cautious.

Ever hear the phrase “for illustration purposes only”?

An illustration is a picture or drawing, but in this case, it doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with actual images. “For illustration purposes only” means that examples are being presented to highlight or explain a topic.

The same is true for an illustration essay. Its purpose is to use evidence to demonstrate a point or prove that a phenomenon exists.

Let’s take a closer look at that definition and learn how to write a good illustration essay.

What Is an Illustration Essay?

At the core of an illustration essay are examples—and plenty of them. The goal of the essay is to use various examples to prove a point or phenomenon.

Don’t confuse the illustration essay with an argument essay.

Although an argument essay uses examples (just as an illustration essay does), the goal of an argument essay is to convince readers. It takes a stance on a subject and attempts to persuade readers of the writer’s opinion.

The illustration essay, on the other hand, should avoid taking a stance and avoid personal opinion. It should remain objective and provide examples to illustrate.

With this definition of an illustration essay in mind, let’s move on to actually writing one.

How to Write a Good Illustration Essay

One of the key steps in writing any good essay is planning. You’ll need to do things like prewrite, research, and outline to focus your ideas.

Here are four steps to help you plan your illustration essay.

Step 1: Find an appropriate topic

Remember, you’re not writing an argument essay, so don’t choose something like abortion or gun control as the focus of your paper.

Instead, choose something like one of the following:

  • College freshmen often become overwhelmed during their first semester.
  • People who live in cold climates are likely to become depressed in winter.
  • Children are influenced by the type of television programs they watch.

These topics don’t present an argument. They present a topic that requires you to incorporate examples to help illustrate the point or phenomenon.

Step 2: Brainstorm a list of examples

You’re going to need a fair amount of examples to support your thesis. Of course, the longer your paper, the more examples you’ll need.

Make sure you list more examples than you think you’ll ultimately include. Chances are, not all of your examples will fit into your paper, so it’s better to be able to leave out a few ideas than to struggle to find more.

Let’s say you’re writing about college freshmen becoming overwhelmed during their first semester.

Your list might include the following examples of what overwhelms students:

  • Classes and the corresponding workload.
  • Balancing work, school, and family obligations.
  • Sorority or fraternity obligations.
  • Extracurricular activities, such as games, practices, and performances.
  • Pressure to maintain grades or to maintain sports or scholarship eligibility.
  • Learning how to do certain tasks for themselves for the first time, such as cooking and laundry.

Your list might need to be longer than this to ultimately find the best three or four key examples, but a short list is a solid start to finding the best examples for your paper.

Step 3: Do research

There are certainly times when your prof won’t require you to include any research. If that’s the case, you’ll simply use your own experiences and ideas as examples.

If you need to incorporate research, however, you will want to find appropriate examples from your sources.

For instance, one example might be a student who almost dropped out of college because he was overwhelmed with coursework. Another example could be a student who sought treatment for panic attacks because she felt pressured to maintain a high GPA in order to keep her scholarship.

Don’t forget to cite your sources in proper format, such as APA or MLA.

Read 5 Best Resources to Help With Writing a Research Paper if you’re looking for a little help with finding sources. (And always make sure they pass the CRAAP test!)

Step #4: Make an outline

The outline is your chance to pull all your information together and sketch out your ideas.

When outlining, you’ll decide which examples you’ll include in your paper and what types of information you’ll provide to illustrate those examples.

You’ll also decide in what order you’ll discuss the examples. It’s often a smart idea to include your strongest example last. That’s what readers will remember.

Don’t forget to include a strong thesis statement in your outline too. That will ensure you have a clear direction for your paper.

2 Tips to Remember

Before you begin drafting your illustration essay, keep these two important tips in mind.

Tip #1: Know the assigned point of view

By point of view, I don’t mean your opinion on the topic. (Remember, your opinion won’t be included in an illustration essay.) I mean the point of view from which you write—you know, first person (I, we, our, us), second person (you, your, you’re), or third person (he, she, it, they).

Third person is preferred in academic writing, so even if you don’t have to include research in your essay, don’t assume that you can write in first person. Check the assignment guidelines to make sure you’re writing from the assigned point of view.

Tip #2: Include enough examples

Your prof probably won’t tell you how many examples you’ll need to include in order to write a successful illustration essay. I don’t have the magic number, either.

What I can tell you, though, is that you should definitely include more than one example to support each key point.

In a shorter essay, two to three examples will generally suffice. If you’re writing an essay longer than four to five pages, you’ll probably need more than three examples to support each main idea.

Check out these sample illustration essays to see how other students incorporate examples into their essays.

Give Yourself a Hand!

You’ve put a lot of time and effort into planning and drafting your paper. Good work!

At this point, I suggest you take a break. Take a walk. Get a snack. Let your mind focus on something else before you return to your paper to revise.  If you have the time, set your paper aside for a day or two, then make any necessary revisions.

At Kibin, we’re always ready to lend a hand with revision too, so let us provide some constructive feedback while you take that walk.

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

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